All Day Study and Test Session

The All Day Study and Test Session held last Sat Sept. 15th. was very successful, we had folks from all professions, from all over East Tn. with the further-est away being from Birmingham, Al.

8 out of 9 passed Element 2, one passed Element 3, and Larc Member upgraded to Extra.

Thanks to all that attended, to those that could not make, get ready for the next one.

 

 

ARRL New Licensees Privileges Request!

ARRL Requests Expanded HF Privileges for Technician Licensees

02/28/2018ARRL has asked the FCC to expand HF privileges for Technician licensees to include limited phone privileges on 75, 40, and 15 meters, plus RTTY and digital mode privileges on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters. The FCC has not yet invited public comment on the proposals, which stem from recommendations put forth by the ARRL Board of Directors’ Entry-Level License Committee, which explored various initiatives and gauged member opinions in 2016 and 2017.

“This action will enhance the available license operating privileges in what has become the principal entry-level license class in the Amateur Service,” ARRL said in its Petition. “It will attract more newcomers to Amateur Radio, it will result in increased retention of licensees who hold Technician Class licenses, and it will provide an improved incentive for entry-level licensees to increase technical self-training and pursue higher license class achievement and development of communications skills.”

Specifically, ARRL proposes to provide Technician licensees, present and future, with phone privileges at 3.900 to 4.000 MHz, 7.225 to 7.300 MHz, and 21.350 to 21.450 MHz, plus RTTY and digital privileges in current Technician allocations on 80, 40, 15, and 10 meters. The ARRL petition points out the explosion in popularity of various digital modes over the past 2 decades. Under the ARRL plan, the maximum HF power level for Technician operators would remain at 200 W PEP. The few remaining Novice licensees would gain no new privileges under the League’s proposal.

ARRL’s petition points to the need for compelling incentives not only to become a radio amateur in the first place, but then to upgrade and further develop skills. Demographic and technological changes call for a “periodic rebalancing” between those two objectives, the League maintains.

“There has not been such a rebalancing in many years,” ARRL said in its petition. “It is time to do that now.” The FCC has not assessed entry-level operating privileges since 2005.

The Entry-Level License Committee offered very specific, data- and survey-supported findings about growth in Amateur Radio and its place in the advanced technological demographic that includes individuals younger than 30. It received significant input from ARRL members via more than 8,000 survey responses.

“The Committee’s analysis noted that today, Amateur Radio exists among many more modes of communication than it did half a century ago, or even 20 years ago,” ARRL said in its petition.

Now numbering some 378,000, Technician licensees comprise more than half of the US Amateur Radio population. ARRL said that after 17 years of experience with the current Technician license as the gateway to Amateur Radio, it’s urgent to make it more attractive to newcomers, in part to improve upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education “that inescapably accompanies a healthy, growing Amateur Radio Service,” ARRL asserted.

ARRL said its proposal is critical to developing improved operating skills, increasing emergency communication participation, improving technical self-training, and boosting overall growth in the Amateur Service, which has remained nearly inert at about 1% per year.

The Entry-Level License Committee determined that the current Technician class question pool already covers far more material than necessary for an entry-level exam to validate expanded privileges. ARRL told the FCC that it would continue to refine examination preparation and training materials aimed at STEM topics, increase outreach and recruitment, work with Amateur Radio clubs, and encourage educational institutions to utilize Amateur Radio in STEM and other experiential learning programs.

“ARRL requests that the Commission become a partner in this effort to promote Amateur Radio as a public benefit by making the very nominal changes proposed herein in the Technician class license operating privileges,” the petition concluded.

Check it out here

http://www.arrl.org/news/arrl-requests-expanded-hf-privileges-for-technician-licensees

 

Next Club Meeting

uBitx radio kit

www.morristownhamfest.com

Buy It Now!

The uBITX is a general coverage HF SSB/CW transceiver kit with features you NEED for operating ease, convenience and versatility. If works from 3 MHz to 30 MHz, with upto 12 watts on SSB and CW with a very sensitive receiver. It features digital tuning, dual VFOs, RIT, CW Keyer and more.  The uBITX is a general coverage HF SSB/CW transceiver kit with features you NEED for operating ease, convenience and versatility. It works from 3 MHz to 30 MHz, with upto 12 watts on SSB and CW with a very sensitive receiver. It features digital tuning, dual VFOs, RIT, CW Keyer and more.

Operating

The uBITX is a joy to operate. Press the tuning control to access all the features. Dual VFOs, RIT, CW speed, sideband selection. etc. are all accessible from a single menu. The transceiver automatically selects the proper sideband for you (you can override it too).

Technical Specifications

The uBITX is an understandable radio. The complexity is kept to a minimum so you can always repair and make changes if you so desire.

The the uBITX has a carefully thought out operator interface. The tuning knob features a number of menu options on a click. From RIT, to dual VFOs, to the keyer and many more featuers are all accessible from the tuning knob by simply tapping on it.There are intelligent defaults everywhere (these are easily overriden). Example : below 10 MHz, it auto-selects LSB and vice versa. To operate CW, you just press the morse key.

Architecture The uBITX uses upconversion to the first IF of 45 MHz. This eliminates the need for a large number of band pass filters, keeping the design simple and virtually image free. The roofing filter at 45 MHz is 15 KHz wide. The signal is then down-converted to 12 MHz where a low ripple SSB filter with 8 crystals is used to provide a sparkling audio.

The transmitter has push-pull PA using two IRF510s for a clean output. The low cost IRF510s are not  a bother to replace should you ever blow them up.

Receiver :

  • Sensitivity a 0.2uv signal is clearly audible
  • Selectivity 2.4 KHz,  low ripple SSB filter with 8 crystals
  • RIT (Receiver Incremental Tuning)
  • Continuous coverage from 500 KHz to 30 MHz
  • Sideband selection
  • Dent-less encoder tuning. Tunes with larger step rates when tuned quickly

Transmitter

  • More than 10 watts upto 10 MHz, 7 watts upto 21 MHz, 2 watts on 28 MHz
  • CW transmit with the built-in keyer
  • Uses   IRF510s  x 2 as PA and  2N3904 x 4 drivers in push-pull mode for low distortion transmission. Blown IRF510 are inexpensive to replace

Raduino Features

This is a small board with an Si5351 clock generator, an Arduino Nano and a 16×2 LCD display. It plugs into the main radio board. The software that controls the radio is written in Arduino’s C langauge.

All the features are available implemented in Raduino software. The menus are accessible by pushing the button on the tuning encoder. You can add more features by hacking through the open source code available on https://github.com/afarhan/ubitx

  • Dual VFOs
  • RIT
  • Manual override of LSB/USB selection
  • CW Keyer Speed and tone selection

µBITX

SKYWARN Recognition Day

Coming up on the Event schedule
Get ready for an antenna party!!!             


SKYWARN Recognition Day, Saturday, December 2

SKYWARN™ Recognition Day (SRD) will take place this year on Saturday, December 2 from 0000 until 2400 UTC (starts on the evening of Friday, December 1, in US time zones). During the SKYWARN Special Event, hams will set up stations at National Weather Service (NWS) offices and contact other radio amateurs around the world.

Participating Amateur Radio stations will exchange a brief description of their current weather with as many NWS-based stations as possible on 80, 40, 20, 15, 10, 6, and 2 meters plus 70 centimeters. Contacts via repeaters are permitted.

SRD was developed jointly in 1999 by the NWS and ARRL to celebrate the contributions SKYWARN volunteers make to the NWS mission — the protection of life and property. Amateur Radio operators, which comprise a large percentage of SKYWARN volunteers, also provide vital communication between the NWS and emergency managers, if normal communications become inoperative. [The National Weather Service and ARRL have been formal partners since 1986].

Tennessee Radio Shack Re-Opens, Partners with Local Ham Radio Club

Tennessee RadioShack Re-Opens, Partners with Local Ham Radio Club

Check out the article published to the ARRL website. This article is going viral across various Facebook groups and pages, its good to see our local radio club and builders group in a positive light to the radio community. Many many thanks goes to the vision of L.A.R.C member Craig Thibodeaux, KM4YEC. Craig has worked diligently with the help of other club members, especially Dan W4DOD,  they have developed a consistent plan of advancement in the Bitx-40 project build, which puts a low cost 40 meter SSB radio in operation for qrp communications. The builders club is openingly sharing this process. Come join the builders group at the next build session on Nov. 18th. 2017, 2:00 P.M, at the  Jefferson City Library, Jefferson City, TN. The group is known as the WE Can Hams Builders Group, website is www.wecanhams.com.

Thanks to the builders, and Radio Shack’s willingness to partner with LARC. Many joint projects are being planned out for the local community.

Club President, Dale Knight AB4DK

http://www.arrl.org/news/tennessee-radioshack-re-opens-partners-with-local-ham-radio-club

VE Testing

VE Testing LARC Meetings

 

Thursday, August 24th. 2017
(4th Thursday of every month)
@ 5:00 P.M.
VE
Testing in Room 1
If you are interested in attending a testing session
to obtain your FCC License
Please email to let us know for confirmation.
lakewayarcboard@gmail.com

Walk ins are welcome:

When coming to a test session, be sure to bring:
Your current License,
A copy of your License,
Any orginal CSCE you have,
A copy of any CSCE Plus the Original,
Your SSN and FCC Licensee Number (Cores or FRN)
Photo ID,
If you are unlicensed bring:
2 ID’s( one with Photo)
Your SSN

Builders Group in Room 2
(note: always show and tell, along with builders group program)

@ 6:00 P.M.
Board Meeting in Room 1: After Testing
Social Gathering in Room 2
(note: this could also be extended builders group on some nights, show and tell, etc)

@ 7:00 P.M.
Meeting / Program in Room 2
Refreshments in Room 1

Where:
First Baptist Church Youth Center,
504 W Main St
Morristown, TN 37814.
Email for details or questions:
lakewayarcboard@gmail.com

Next Meeting July

Thursday, July 27nd. 2017
Testing @ 5:00 P.M. ,
Board Meeting @6:00 P.M.
Meeting/ Program @7:00 P.M.
Where: First Baptist Church Youth Center,
504 W Main St
Morristown, TN 37814.
Email for details or questions:
lakewayarcboard@gmail.com

Walk ins are welcome
If you are interested in attending a testing session to obtain your FCC License
Please email to let us know for confirmation.
lakewayarcboard@gmail.com